Carleton University


200 - NATURE’S WONDERS: From Rocks to Plants to Fishes and other Animals

Nature hides its secrets well. Every day we take for granted the amazing natural world around us, as it quietly goes about its business. Until, one day, we are forced to confront it. Then we have questions, about soils and rocks, plants and trees that we aren’t familiar with, animal habitats that seem to be in the wrong place, and the strange world under the surface of the water? Suddenly we want to know what it all means, as the change in landscape and loss of habitat are increasingly brought to our attention. In this course, a different environment on the University campus will be explored every day, through discussions, hands-on experiments, and group projects. Towards the end of the week, we will bring all these experiences together to see how Environmental Science can help us better understand and respect the Wonders of Nature.

Instructor: Lindsay Trottier, Madelaine Bourdages & Alexa D’addario
School or Department: Environmental Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


201 - Teach your Computer to Paint

This is a course that can be taken by anyone with an interest in art or an interest in computers. In this course, we will learn how to make digital drawings, paintings and animations by programming within the Processing environment. Processing is a free interactive system specially created for digital artists -- artists can work inside it to get some computer help in making animations, graphics, and even artificial life. The course will include lots of hands-on practice where participants can experiment with writing their own computer programs to make computer art, animations or games.

Instructor: Jason Hinek
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


202 - Out of This World Physics

For Grades 9-11 Ontario/Sec. 3-5 Québec ONLY!
What does it mean to be a physicist? Come and learn about the current groundbreaking research happening right here in Ottawa at the Carleton University Physics Department. During this hands-on course, you will be able to recreate some of the most famous physics experiments in history. You will have the chance to make your own hologram, levitate a superconductor, and learn about what stars are made of and how they die. You will also visit real research labs and the astronomical observatory on campus.

Join us in discovering how “out of this world” physics is being done!


Instructor: Tamara Rozina
School or Department: Physics
Grades: Min: 9 - Max: 11


203 - Programming Artificial Life

You may be surprised to learn how mathematics, physics, and computer science together can help us to display almost every phenomenon in the living world; the movement of two bacteria, the growth of a tree, and a diving hawk can be generated artificially. In this mini-course, you will learn how to program in the Processing environment, which is a flexible language for learning how to code within the context of the visual arts. It's popular among artists and other people who are not programmers, yet want to make simple animations and graphics. You will learn the basic instructions of this language and you will see how you can give life to objects that can move and interact with each other.

Instructor: Rosa Azami
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


204 - Probability, Statistics, Mathematics: Explore the many applications to such things as playground structures, Casinos, M&M candies, the Rubik’s Cube, and much more!

In our sessions, we will take you on a ride to explore the connections that dice, regular solids, cards, M&Ms candies, election polling, Rubik's cube, and health have with mathematics, statistics, and probability. From designing your own casino game and running it in a "Casino" afternoon to solving the Rubik's cube, you are guaranteed an experience you will never forget!

Instructor: Ahmed Almaskut
School or Department: Mathematics
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


205 - Genetics 101: The good, the bad and the future

Are you interested in genetics? Would you like to understand the fundamental basics of inheritance? Have you ever wondered why there’s so much variation in nature? Asked what genetic engineering and gene manipulation are? If so, this course is definitely for you!

In this fun, exciting and engaging course we will expand our knowledge of genetics, starting from genes and DNA all the way to epigenetics and transgenic species. This course will also explain what GMOs are, how they are produced and how prevalent they are in our modern food chain. We will review the scientific facts, pros and cons of genetic engineering, its applications in modern life and find out whether it plays an essential role to solve problems such as world hunger, or if it is secretly and silently killing us.


Instructor: Narges Zare
School or Department: Biology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


206 - The Wonderful World of Computer Science: Just for Girls

Have you ever wondered how the apps you use every day are built? What about how computers work? Kind of seems magical, doesn’t it? Let’s uncover the mysteries of computer science together and let our imaginations run wild. If you like solving problems, then grab your magic wand (mouse) and a book of spells (keyboard) and let’s learn how to make some magic with computers! Together we will learn the basics of computer science using “Processing” (a Java-based programming language) and explore various topics like usability and design, algorithms and artificial intelligence. No experience necessary! Coding is magical so be prepared to leave with a lot of cool tricks to show your friends.

Instructor: Elisa Kazan
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


207 - The Magic of the Double Helix: How Genetics Rules the World Around Us

Genetics play an important part in who we are. You’ve probably heard of characteristic terms such as DNA, genes and heredity, but what do they mean? This interactive course will cover it all with hands-on lessons and engaging experiments to master the basics of genetics. You’ll learn how genes work and how the different versions we inherit affect our daily lives and our society. You will understand why DNA fingerprinting is so powerful in forensic science, and what analysis of your DNA can reveal. You’ll be able to answer important questions, such as "If our DNA is so similar, why do we look so different?" Finally, we will touch on genetic disorders and some biotechnology, including cloning and the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

Instructor: Nathalie Puchacz
School or Department: Biology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


208 - Nano is smaller, but stronger!

The course provides an interesting introduction to nanotechnology in a simple word for high school students. In this mini-course, we will discuss the scale and types of nanomaterial, characterization tools, synthesis methods and application of nanomaterial by using chemistry, physics and math at a high school level. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the unique and amazing properties of nanoscale material and devices without any previous knowledge of the field. The outlines of the course are:
- Background and history of nanoscience,
- How big is nano?
- Smaller is stronger!
- How to build it, how to see it.
- Let’s go green with nano.
- Guess what happens next!


Instructor: Esmaeil Mahdavi
School or Department: School of Information Technology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


209 - Modern Cryptography

Cryptography protects secrets when they are sent over the Internet. It also ensures downloaded programs and web pages are authentic. In this course, students will learn the basics of cryptography and how it is used. Topics will include the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, public key cryptography, the discrete logarithm problem, Diffie-hellman key exchange, RSA encryption, time complexity, Euler’s totient function, secure web browsers, password management/storage/salting, HTTPS, perfect forward secrecy, hash functions, and TOR. A wide range of videos is provided to enhance the students’ learning experience, together with different activities like homework or self-assignments to motivate and guide students.

Instructor: Nilofar Mansourzadeh
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


210 - Designing interactive GUIs and NUIs

Have you ever felt frustrated while using your computer? For example, the icons are too small or the menu options don’t make sense? In this workshop, you will learn how to design usable and interactive graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and natural user interfaces (NUIs) using research-based methods. Applying design principles such as colours, symbols, patterns, and metaphors, you will learn how to design engaging user-interfaces and how to evaluate them. In teams, we will build prototypes using both paper and computer software. We will also explore the difference between designing for a wide range of users (e.g.: children and the elderly) and platforms (e.g., mobile vs. desktop applications).

Instructor: Gerry Chan
School or Department: School of Information Technology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


211 - I wish I could create my own website

The web is a very big place and we all use it every single day for different purposes like entertainment, education or business, but how many of us actually know how it really works? How is it built? How do browsers, computers, and other devices with an Internet connection interact with the web? This course is all about the journey we will be taking to create our website.

In this course, we will learn how the web works and we will be designing and building a site together using programming languages like HTML, CSS and JavaScript. It will give you a step by step guide for bringing a website to life. We will also learn some introductory remarks about single-page applications that allow dynamic interaction with the users, and use websites to learn some principles of Human-computer interaction.


Instructor: Zahra Hassanzadeh
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


212 - Turning microbes to gold

In this environmentally friendly course, we will discuss the advances in environmental and industrial biotechnology, and the use of microorganisms as little workers to convert our waste and raw products to useful materials. We will learn how these microorganisms are used as little miners in gold mines. We will talk about recent approaches in biotechnology to remedy the accumulation of biological wastes and pollutants. We will talk about many examples of how bioremediation technology is used to restore toxic mines and clean crude oil spills. We will also talk about GMOs and argue the main concerns about global warming and recent solutions. In our last session, we will talk about an exciting new science called astrobiology and we will use our imagination and creativity combined with recent technology that we learned to propose new solutions to keep our planet clean.

Instructor: Houman Moteshareie
School or Department: Biology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


213 - School of Rock! An introduction to Earth Science

Ever wonder why the Earth has volcanic eruptions and earthquakes? Or how fossils are used to study the age of the Earth? Are you curious about how diamonds were found in the far north of Canada? Or why mineral deposits are important to your everyday life? The answers to these questions are found through the study of earth science. We will use field investigations, interactive lectures, and a wide variety of laboratory explorations and experiments to help you understand and appreciate the complexities of your home, Planet Earth. The week will include a visit to the Talisman Energy Fossil Gallery at the Canadian
Museum of Nature, and an outdoor field trip to Hogs Back Falls.


Instructor: Beth McLarty Halfkenny
School or Department: Earth Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


214 - Controlling your world is as easy as Pi. Raspberry Pi

Students will be introduced to the world of embedded computing with the Raspberry Pi series of devices.

A Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that costs around $50, that can be easily set up to plug into your TV and attach to your network, keyboard, and mouse. But it need not be connected to anything. One of the first tasks given to the students would be to re-configure the device so it's "standalone". The Raspberry Pi is versatile because it can be connected to other devices to turn on/off lights, detect button presses, and even control motors (for those daring to try so).

The first few classes will be an introduction to the hardware, the Raspbian operating system (i.e. Debian Linux), and how to connect to interface boards. We will also learn how to control the devices remotely, including a robotic arm that can be programmed to pick up & move objects. The students, working in pairs, will then be given the opportunity to use their own creativity to create their own system that connects to "the internet of things".

NOTE: if they want to take home their own work (Raspberry Pi starter kit, connectors & cables), there will be an option for students to purchase the work they’ve completed for $120.


Instructor: Bobby Chawla
School or Department: Systems and Computer Engineering
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


215 - Explore the crossroads of Medicine & Engineering

Technology is continually changing and growing. When it comes to new medical gadgets, biomedical engineers are at the forefront of development, helping to improve existing equipment and create new devices. Biomedical engineers apply their knowledge of science and math to medical problems to come up with exciting and innovative solutions. Learn what goes into designing artificial organs and joints, predicting heart attacks before they happen, or using your eyeballs to control computers. These are the types of things that biomedical engineers help make possible. This mini-course will focus on the types of tools that biomedical engineers use on a daily basis and allow for hands-on experience measuring and manipulating biological signals.

Instructor: Shermeen Nizami and Mohamed Abdelazez
School or Department: Systems and Computer Engineering
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


216 - Build Your Own Ideas

In this hands-on course, you will explore technological tools such as 3D printers and laser cutters and CAD tools to learn to make your own cool stuff! Classes will introduce you to the design process: brainstorm ideas, develop concepts through sketching, illustration, and CAD – all set in a design studio environment! The course will also introduce you to the importance of exploring ideas confidently, test ideas and get user feedback. The week will conclude with a display, presentation, and discussion of student designs.

Instructor: Guillermo Juarez
School or Department: Industrial Design
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


217 - Making Your World: From Garbage to Goods!

In this hands-on course, you will experience what it is like to design a new product. The challenge: this new product must begin its life in the garbage dump. How can something new and exciting be made out of the stuff we throw away every day? Brainstorm ideas, develop new concepts through sketching and testing and make models of your concept like a real industrial designer in a real design studio. The course will also introduce you to the values of sustainable design, the importance of market research and user needs, form and colour principles, two-dimensional computer illustration, materials, and production processes. The week will conclude with a display, presentation, and discussion of student designs

Instructor: Anna Kim
School or Department: Industrial Design
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


218 - From Me to We: Social Change using Public Relations

If you loved the 'Me to We' movement on 'We Day’ back in November then this course is your next stop! What to do with all those good vibes is to now make the social change in the world that you want to see! Take this mini-course and learn hands-on how to do it… In this public relations workshop course, you will learn fast how advertising and public perception and ’spin' can make positive social changes happen in the world, raise money for needed cures and make corporations accountable. Using the same techniques as used in negative public relations, students in groups will choose a cause they care about and design a plan to help them using research, public relations and presenting. They will learn how to make a social impact immediately. They’ll dive into how stakeholder research generates the same buying powers to help sell ideas along with products like Red Bull, Occupy-Wall Street, cancer research and iPhones. Students will learn public speaking and pitch presentations, skills to apply right away to be on boards of charities, advise causes and raise much-needed awareness and funds for a cause that matters to them in their lives outside of this week-long course. Students have gone on to the Mayors Council, started their own charity, been invited into the Prime Minister’s Youth Advisory Council and become Youth Directors on charitable boards.

Instructor: Karen Keskinen
School or Department: Journalism
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


219 - #Feminist: Feminism & Pop Culture

Feminism isn’t a dirty word anymore; even celebrities like Beyoncé, Emma Watson, and our very own Prime Minister are taking back the label. Using feminist theory as a starting point, this course encourages young people of all genders to look at how popular culture shapes our understanding of gender roles, identity, and more. Each day we will cover a specific form of pop culture, including social media, movies, television, and music. Students will work in groups toward making a creative final project that will allow them to talk back to dominant gender norms in society.

Disclaimer: This course will examine sensitive subjects in an age-appropriate way. This includes, but is not limited to, discussions of sex and sexuality, gender, race, mental health, etc.


Instructor: Amanda Roberts
School or Department: Political Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


220 - GOT LAW? An Introduction to Canadian Law

Have you ever wondered what your rights are as a youth? How do they differ from someone who is over the age of 18? What body of law do lawyers use if you are a youth offender? What are your rights if you are First Nation? Do they differ? Are you able to sue a hockey player if you get hit in the face with a hockey puck? Why can hockey players fight and not be charged with assault? What happens if you are arrested and you are only 14 years old? Does your landlord have the right to evict you if you play loud music? What about Facebook bullying and cyberbullying? Is it against the law to post a bad picture of someone on Facebook and make fun of them? Law is all around us. It shapes our world and regulates how we act, think, learn and create. Law affects our autonomy, dignity, respect. And law regulates the way we love and are loved. If you are interested in the way law shapes your world and you wonder what you can do about it, this is the course for you! In class, we discuss private law, public law, human rights, family law, criminal law, civil liberties and more!! We use social media, films, news articles and websites to learn about Canadian law. We will use skits and your very own acting skills to illustrate Canadian law. So be ready to act!!! Field trips to the Supreme Court, Provincial Court and the Human Rights Monument are planned. An Ottawa Police officer will talk to the class about careers in law. And, someone from Ontario Civil Liberties Association will give us some insight into civil liberties. If you want to know how the Canadian legal system works then GOT LAW? is your course!!! Please note that topics will include the age of consent, alcohol, the legalization of marijuana and the Supreme Court decision on safe injection sites. We respectfully ask that cell phones and tablets are left in school bags as they will not be required for this interactive, hands-on learning experience.

Instructor: Barbara Ann Vocisano
School or Department: Law
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


221 - Becoming Cyborgs: Exploring our relationships with modern technology

Are we becoming one with our technologies? We use them to search for answers, find dates, track our fitness, and so much more. This course will investigate our increasingly complicated relationships with the technologies we encounter on a daily basis. We will look at the ways that our devices extend and enhance our abilities by allowing us to do more, know more and produce more. Students will also be encouraged to look critically of these relationships through discussions of surveillance, privacy, and control.

The course will involve a variety of content and activities, including videos, documentaries, film, mock debates and short writing exercises. Guest speakers will bring interesting new perspectives on topics such as health technology, social media and visual culture.


Instructor: Jessica Chapman
School or Department: School of Journalism and Communication
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


222 - Make a Zine! D.I.Y publishing & youth subcultures

Bring your big ideas and publish them yourself! Enter the workshop to create your own mini-magazine/zine, while learning and exchanging thoughts about media, politics, and youth cultural activism. In this course, students will look at a number of zines to help understand the powerful role of small media in supporting free speech, community building, and empowerment in youth cultural movements from the 1980s until today. A zine (pronounced zeen) is a self-made magazine, filled with text, photos, and drawings, usually stapled together and photocopied to distribute in small networks. Students will spend a portion of each afternoon working to design and create their own zines. They will print and bind a number of copies to trade, share, and take home, with the option of distributing at local bookshops in Ottawa.

Instructor: Meagan Bell
School or Department: Public Affairs
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


223 - "Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the war room!": AN Exploration of Social Theory through Film

A film is a reflection of our society, and theory a way of interpreting social phenomena. Over five days, this course will explore introductory concepts in social theory which will be examined concurrently through the lens of film studies. With part lecture, dialogue and film viewing, this class will uncover a myriad of sociological themes. For instance, how does Charlie Chaplin's 1936 film "Modern Times" mirror concepts from Karl Marx's understanding of the working day and Harry Braverman's “Labour and Monopoly Capital”? What does Theodore Melfi's 2016 film "Hidden Figures" reveal about race and gender, and how does it relate to bell hooks’ concepts of "Feminism and Class Power" and W.E.B De Bois' notion of "Double Consciousness"? Somemature themes and subject matter will be explored.

Instructor: Megan McGoey-Smith
School or Department: Public Affairs
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


225 - Power and the City: Who Does What Where We Live and How

Have you ever wondered how your favourite part of the city was planned and put together? This mini-course will explore the various functions of the modern city and the municipal level of government. How does the municipal government make decisions? How can residents participate in these decisions? Focusing on Ottawa, we will explore how decisions are made about everything from traffic flow, to park improvements, to legal graffiti walls. Students will learn from experienced guest speakers. Students will build upon this information by creating their own imaginary mini-city, engaging in role-playing activities, and using city planning simulations. This course will also feature a short field trip to a location in Ottawa that demonstrates how
developments in a city impact, and are impacted by, residents.


Instructor: Michael Petite
School or Department: Political Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


226 - Cheap shots and Trash Talk: The revolution at the checkout counter

Sneaky ads, fast fashion, and piles of trash. Come, learn about the power of day-to-day decisions in the shaping of the economy. In this course we will explore the hidden life of the things we buy, consume, and discard: Who made them? How did they get here? How are they advertised? Where do they go after consumption? Through presentations, field trips, videos and discussions we will go searching for the human and environmental costs behind consumer products and learn about the differences between linear and circular economies. Your task will be to create a social media ad (your choice of explainer video, infographic, a meme series, etc.) to pass on the info you learn in this course to others.

Instructor: Patricia Wallinger
School or Department: Institute of Political Economy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


227 - Hackers: Heroes or just hacks?

Have you heard about Russian hackers meddling in the US elections? Hackers have also made the news for taking down VISA, Amazon, and PayPal’s websites. But who are these mysterious and seemingly all-powerful people? In this class, we will explore popular representations of hackers in the media and fiction. This course will help students question what is represented in news and entertainment, as well as give them chances to creatively imagine how hackers might help the world. Looking at the infamous actions of the hacker group Anonymous as well as popular depictions of hackers on shows like Halt and Catch Fire and Ghost in the Machine, we will examine how society likes to imagine hackers and some of the realities of hacking.

Instructor: Seonaid Watson
School or Department: Communication and Media Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


228 - Living the Change in Canada: Social Justice and Social Change Movements in the 21st Century

From the local to the global, the injustices that society faces today are increasingly complex. The way that we collectively work to face these injustices are equally as complex. This course will look at social movements in Canada over the past two decades. Looking at movements such as Idle No More, Black Lives Matter, $15 and Fairness and No One is Illegal, we will work to understand how they create change. We will challenge dominant narratives around what activism and social movements “should” look like. This course will ask ”how has social media impacted how we mobilize as communities? What motivates social change work? How does power and privilege of different communities impact the way social movements operate?”

Instructor: Jesse Whattam
School or Department: Institute of Political Economy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


229 - Write by the River – Explore, reading, writing, travel, & life.

Part writing workshop, part creative inquiry into the possibilities of living, this course will take place in a window-lined room beside water, and occasionally, on the banks of the lovely Rideau river. Together we will learn skills to help you read and write poetry, short stories, novels, personal essays, articles, blogs, musical lyrics, travel, humour and memoir writing. Students will view a thought-provoking film, and write fun, stimulating writing exercises designed to unlock their great ideas and jumpstart their creative thinking. You will write a postcard story, and in groups of three write 3 chapter mini-novels. Shared in-class writing will be discussed and any previously written pieces you wish to bring along will also receive feedback and encouragement. You can look forward to a guest writer, homemade chocolate chip cookies, and other pleasant surprises.

Instructor: Richard Taylor
School or Department: English
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


230 - Mandarin: The most widely spoken language in the world

Is Chinese a difficult language to learn? The answer is No. Besides its characters, Chinese is a relatively simple and easy language. Spelling in Pinyin is phonetic; there are no verb conjugations (as in English or French); there are no complex plurals (as in English or French) and no gender to nouns (as in French). Chinese speak with different tones. Afraid of the tones, after this mini-course you’ll never fret tones again. Do Chinese greet people differently than we do in North America? What does the modern generation watch on TV? How do Chinese people text using characters? Attend this mini course and get the answers to all these questions and more.

Instructor: Hong Han
School or Department: School of Linguistics and Language Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


231 - Language in the Brain through the Eyes of a Nerd

You know where your heart is, you know where your lungs are, but do you know where language is? Have you ever wondered how children jump from knowing two to three words to suddenly having a vast vocabulary? Do you find animal communication fascinating? What can you do with a career in Linguistics? In this course, we will virtually dissect the brains of humans and animals to answer these questions and many more! This interactive course will provide a brief introduction to various techniques such a fieldwork and brain-imaging and you will discover language beyond grammar rules and Shakespeare. You will get hands-on experience by collecting, analyzing and interpreting real-life linguistic material. The course introduces you to Linguistic and Psycholinguistic research.

Instructor: Roxana-Maria Barbu
School or Department: Institute of Cognitive Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


232 - Me, Myself, and Science!

Have you ever wondered how the brain works? What artificial intelligence is? Or why do we dream? If you have, this course is for you!

From fundamental building blocks of science to cutting-edge research, we will traverse history and different fields of psychological and cognitive research to explore how humanity has sought to learn more about who we are. Through group discussions, we will explore what science is, how psychologists study people, popular theories of the mind, and state of the art technology in research. For the second half of this course, students will choose their own lecture topics.


Instructor: Misha Sokolov
School or Department: Institute of Cognitive Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


233 - Introduction to Japanese

Have you ever wanted to visit Japan? Taste the freshest sushi, see where all your favourite video games and anime are made, or journey up Mount Fuji? Make sure you can ask someone how to get to Tokyo Station by taking your first step to learning Japanese in this introductory course. In this course, you will learn how to introduce yourself, greet others, ask questions, and write in Japanese. We will also explore Japanese culture along the way. What are other cities outside of Tokyo famous for? What is high school life like in Japan? Take this course to learn basic Japanese communication skills and get a glimpse into Japanese culture and customs with various class activities.

Instructor: Kaori Sugimura
School or Department: Linguistics and Language Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


234 - BTS and Beyond: Learning Korean through Art and Culture

This course is designed to introduce the Korean language and culture to the students. During the EMCP week, students will learn basic conversational Korean by translating the lyrics of K-pop songs, discussing Korean art and key historical events in Korean history, and participating in Korean temple food tasting. By the end of the week, students will be able to carry out simple conversations in Korean. In addition, they will be able to identify the key elements of the Korean visual culture and history beyond internationally renowned k-pop bands. This is a crash Korean language course that could open the door to your inspirational journey through the Korean culture and history of the last five millennia.

Instructor: Euijung McGillis
School or Department: Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art and Culture
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


235 - All Over the Map: Imaginary places, phantom islands, and unknown lands

Maps help us find our way; they show us where we are and how to get where we're going. They represent the world around us. Or so it seems. Maps order a world that is in constant movement, create borders people cross every day, and show us places we have never been. And maybe places we can only dream of. In this course, we will explore imaginary places, phantom islands, and unknown lands on and off the map. From Hogsmeade to Sandy Island, to medieval maps, we will examine the social and political roles mapping has played throughout history, and what it means to map unknown and imaginary worlds.

Instructor: Cassandra Marsillo
School or Department: History
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


237 - The 101 questions about language

Did you know what it is going on your brain when you speak a language or when you are learning a new language? Did you know there are approximately 6,500 spoken languages in the world? Did you know that there are around 70 different indigenous languages spoken in Canada? Did you know that most of those languages will disappear in the years to come? Do you know why languages die? Did you think sign language was just a bunch of hand gestures? If you have questions about language this course is for you. We will explore 101 questions about language. We focus on language from three major perspectives: language and the brain, language teaching and learning, and language and culture.

Instructor: Amelia Reis Silva & Christina Dore
School or Department: School of Linguistics and Language Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


238 - Parody or Plagiarism? Creative Writing and the Literary Tradition

In her influential work Irony and Parody, Linda Hutcheon defines parody in a productively broad manner as “repetition with a difference.” Plagiarism is the presentation of someone else’s work as one’s own. But how can one tell the difference between intellectual theft (plagiarism) and engaging creatively with the literary tradition (parody)? In this course, we will study four short texts that deliberately engage with the literary tradition in the spirit of parody. While the morning sessions will be devoted to literary analysis, the afternoon sessions will involve creative-writing exercises that use these texts as springboards for original work. Each day will conclude with a “Writing Circle” where participants will share and analyze—in a respectful and productive setting—their ideas for rewriting the texts under study.

Instructor: Dana Dragunoiu
School or Department: English
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


239 - Popcorn Anyone? Music at the Movies

John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Michael Giacchino—the names of composers for the Harry Potter series, the Star Wars franchise, the Dark Knight trilogy, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy are as familiar as those of the directors they work for, yet few people know how they create movie magic. This mini-course explores the world of composing for film by examining soundtracks and composers for some of the biggest movies of the last decade. We’ll answer questions like: How do they compose? How and when is music added to the movie? Why does the film’s soundtrack have such an impact on audiences? If you can’t read music, that’s no problem: our course bases itself on hearing (and seeing) movies, not following scores.

Instructor: James Deaville
School or Department: Music
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


240 - Master Designer Canada – Are you ready to design solutions?

Be a part of a design thinking space and learn the crucial steps to brainstorm, visualize and bring to life your ideas and creative solutions. This mini-course will introduce you to the design thinking process (empathize, define, ideate, prototype and test) and give you hands-on exposure. Students will be given “mystery boxes” to build on their problem-solving abilities and find solutions to real-world issues. So, get your designer hats on and get set to explore and invent. After this course, you will never look at designing the same way again!

Instructor: Juwaeriah Siddiqui
School or Department: School of Linguistics and Language Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


242 - Body Positivity 101

Have you ever wondered why the average model size in North America is 0-4 while the average woman is a size 16-18?

In this course we will explore the growing body positive movement and its popular slogan: all bodies are good bodies. Topics we will cover include: the relationship between societal beauty standards and body image; the lack of representation of diverse bodies in the media; the history of the body positive movement and some prominent activists; assumptions and stereotypes around fatness; feminism and diet culture; and how to practice self-care. This course is open to all genders and body types.


Instructor: Kat Huybregts
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


243 - A 5-day crash course on Korean

Recently, Korean culture such as music, movies and food has gained popularity around the world. Even the word, “Hallyu” (Korean wave), was created to represent the phenomenon. Are you a fan of K-pop or K-drama? Do you love to have Korean food? Then what would be a better way to explore Korea and its culture than learning the Korean language? In this mini-course, students will learn not only to read the Korean alphabet, “Hangeul” but also to use various expressions in everyday life situations. At the end of the course, students will be able to use Korean expressions in a Korean restaurant or a Korean store around the Ottawa area. The course also offers opportunities to participate in and outside of campus activities: a calligraphy class and a field trip to the Korean Cultural Centre.

Instructor: Seunghee Chung and Soyoung Kang
School or Department: School of Linguistics and Language Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


244 - Exploring Europe! Culture and Identity in the European Union

Want to know more about the food, music, landscapes, and heritage of European countries? What is identity and do Europeans share a common identity? What EU institutions are responsible for heritage? How does the EU’s cultural policy compare to Canada’s multicultural policy?

Throughout the week we will explore the unique cultures of European countries through studying folklore, food, language, dance, policies and institutions. We will compare the EU’s approach to cultural policy and Canada’s own multicultural policy. This will be explored through interactive activities, videos, presentations, guest speakers from embassies and live performances by folk groups. Filled with colourful histories, distinct languages, unique folklore and delicious foods, this journey through Europe is sure to be a fun and engaging experience.


Instructor: Maria Colja
School or Department: European, Russia, and Eurasian Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


245 - From Dreaming to Drugs: Exploring the Mysteries of the Mind

Have you ever been curious about why people think, feel, and act the way they do? If you’ve ever had questions about emotions, sleep, criminal activity, dreaming, the senses, mental illness, development, the brain, memory or drugs, then you may be interested in psychology. During this course, you will learn about each of the different areas of psychology as we travel through the mind. Creating in-class experiments will give you the chance to be a psychology researcher and learn about the scientific method, while we debunk common psychology myths. Fun activities and real-life examples will let you personally experience the marvels of the mind. After this course, you will never look at yourself the same way again!

Instructor: Mariya Davydenko
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


246 - Cyber Psychology: Human behaviour and the online world

Do you remember life without the internet? Probably not! You are what we call a “digital native”. You have grown up with access to the web – and that has had an impact on your overall development! In this course we will explore psychological aspects of cyberspace. We will examine crucial questions surrounding the internet’s effects on human behaviour. For example, why do some people act differently online compared to offline? Can social media really influence our relationships? We will be investigating new trends in internet technology, aspects of online friendships, online aggression, group dynamics, child development, online gaming, privacy and surveillance, and the internet’s addictive qualities. This mini course will provide knowledge that will allow critical insight into how and why our online behaviour unfolds

Instructor: Kristen Archbell
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


247 - Sugar and Spice But Not Always Nice: Understanding the Social World of Girls

(This course is for GIRLS ONLY)
Have you ever wondered why girls who were your best friends last week are suddenly excluding you from their plans and telling malicious, hurtful rumours about you? Together we will examine this phenomenon called “social aggression” within the broader context of the dynamics of girls’ social groups. We will discuss the role and form aggression can take in girls’ friendships and explore possible explanations for why aggression is kept underground in girls’ groups. We will look at bullying and emotional abuse within close friendships.

Our goal will be to generate effective strategies for dealing with conflict in close relationships and to explore ideas for enjoying friendships without fear or dread for what tomorrow might hold.


Instructor: Tina Daniels, Ph.D.
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


248 - #Selfies, Vlogs, Tumblr & Blogs: Feminist Social Media for Social Change

We all know the stereotype: today’s youth are self-indulgent, consumer-driven, apathetic, social media zombies. But how much truth do these tropes really carry? And what about the socially conscious youth who are using feminist-inspired media as a platform for social change? Some say we are entering a wave of cyberfeminism, where youth are creating virtual spaces to grapple with feminist ideals of social justice, equality and human rights. In this course we’ll engage in the reclamation of social media by using it to raise awareness and combat intersectional oppressions in our everyday lives. Using creative group activities and interactive multi-media projects, we’ll reboot problematic stereotypes about feminism, youth culture and technology. Let’s take back the feminist selfie, the zines and the tumblr pages to show how #youthculture can #changetheworld.

Trigger Warning: This course will touch on potentially sensitive issues like discrimination, intersectional oppressions, violence against women, and cyber-bullying.


Instructor: Melissa Conte
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11