Carleton University


200 - NATURE’S WONDERS: From Rocks to Plants to Fishes and other Animals

Nature hides its secrets well. Every day we take for granted the amazing natural world around us, as it quietly goes about its business. Until, one day, we are forced to confront it. Then we have questions, about soils and rocks, plants and trees that we aren’t familiar with, animal habitats that seem to be in the wrong place, and the strange world under the surface of the water? Suddenly we want to know what it all means, as change in landscape and loss of habitat are increasingly brought to our attention. In this course, a different environment on the University campus will be explored every day, through discussions, hands-on experiments, and group projects. Towards the end of the week, we will bring all these experiences together to see how Environmental Science can help us better understand and respect the Wonders of Nature.

Instructor: Sarah Walton
School or Department: Environmental Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


201 - Teach your Computer to Paint

This is a course that can be taken by anyone with an interest in art or an interest in computers. In this course, we will learn how to make digital drawings, paintings and animations by programming within the "processing" environment. "Processing" is an interactive system especially created for digital artists -- artists can work inside it to get some computer help in making animations, graphics, and even artificial life. The course will include lots of hands-on practice where participants can experiment with writing their own computer programs to make computer art, animations or games.

Instructor: Jason Hinek
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


202 - Out of This World Physics

For Grades 9-11 Ontario/Sec. 3-5 Québec ONLY!
How are holograms made? How do we use levitation? Where does cosmic radiation come from? What elements are found in our sun? Through experiments, see how physics can answer these questions. During this hands-on course you will make your own hologram, levitate a superconductor and tour our observatory. You will hear about what stars are made of and how they die. Join us in discovering how “out of this world” physics can be used in everyday life.

Instructor: Penka Matanska and Tamara Rozina
School or Department: Physics
Grades: Min: 9 - Max: 11


203 - Interactive Technologies and You!

Do you want to build a website or app? Are you interested in the latest technology out there? Ever wonder how your phone works? If you answer yes to any of these questions then this course is for you. We will cover the fundamentals of web development and android applications. Together as a class, we will build an interactive website and a basic app. You will learn basic HTML and CSS as well as Android Studio for tablets and phones. By the end of the course, you will have learned several fundamental skills needed in the real world.


Instructor: Fraydon Karimi
School or Department: Information Technology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


204 - The Magic of the Double Helix: How Genetics Rule the World Around Us

Genetics play an important part in who we are. You’ve probably heard of characteristic terms such as DNA, genes and heredity, but what do they mean? This interactive course will cover it all with hands-on lessons and engaging experiments to master the basics of genetics. You’ll learn how genes work and how the different versions we inherit affect our daily lives and our society. You will understand why DNA fingerprinting is so powerful in forensic science, and what analysis of your DNA can reveal. You’ll be able to answer important questions, such as why our DNA are so similar but our appearances are so different? Finally, we will touch on genetic disorders and some biotechnology, including cloning and the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).


Instructor: Nathalie Puchacz
School or Department: Biology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


205 - A Week of Competition Math

Do you want to experience math as a team sport? Do you want to know what it is like to be a math olympian? In this course, you will get a chance to learn from a former international math olympian and a seasoned mathlete on topics that appear in math competitions . Each of the first four days will consist of a lecture, a problem-solving session and mock a team competition. The last day will consist of an math olympiad-like exam and an awards ceremony.

Note that this course is primarily for Grade 10 and Grade 11 students with a strong interest in math though Grade 9 students with exceptional math abilities are also welcome.

Instructor: Keith McCuaig
School or Department: Mathematics and Statistics
Grades: Min: 9 - Max: 11


206 - Amazing things you can do in your web browser

You use the internet everyday, yet do you know how it really works? Web programming is one of the fastest growing programming skills because internet access is becoming available on most of our devices. If you want to build the next Google, Instagram or YouTube, you need to learn web programming first.

In this course you learn how to create programs that run inside a web browser. With just a few lines of code you can run cool programs on your phones, laptops, tablets or any other device that has access to internet. You will learn how to create a simple website using programming languages like HTML, CSS and JavaScript. This course offers you the excitement of building something cool inside a browser along with learning the basics of web programming.


Instructor: Arash Nouri
School or Department: Computer Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


207 - Turning Microbes to Gold

In this environmental friendly course, we will discuss the advances in environmental and industrial biotechnology, and the use of microorganisms as little workers to convert our waste and raw products to useful materials. We will learn how these microorganisms are used as little miners in gold mines. We will talk about recent approaches in biotechnology to remedy the accumulation of biological wastes and pollutants. We will talk about many examples of how bio-remediation technology is used to restore toxic mines and clean crude oil spills. We will also talk about GMOs and argue the main concerns about Global warming and recent solutions. In the end, we will use our imagination and creativity combined with recent technology that we learned to propose new solutions to keep our planet clean.

Instructor: Houman Moteshareie
School or Department: Biology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


209 - Probability, Statistics, Mathematics, Games, Regular Solids, Election Polling, Rubiks Cube: Explore the Connections

Our sessions will involve a selection of activities such as: using “regular solids” (dice with different numbers of sides) and cards to discover the laws of probability; designing your own Casino games, making the probability calculations to ensure a “house” win, and running them in a “Casino” afternoon; learning the mathematics of the Rubik’s cube; looking at methods for gathering data, measuring uncertainty and reliability in the data, and drawing conclusions; discussing the difference between causality and correlation; etc.

Instructor: Ahmed Almaskut
School or Department: Mathematics and Statistics
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


210 - What is the brain, how does it work and what goes wrong when it gets sick?

The brain is one of the most complex organs in the body. The adult brain weighs 3 pounds, but it is the most energy-demanding organ in our body. It uses 20% of our daily caloric intake. This course will examine how the brain responds to the environment, controls our body movements, brain anatomy and function. There will also be a discussion of what happens when the brain is injured. We will begin to unravel the exciting world of the brain by looking at both the general structure of the brain right down to the cell signaling in neurons. Through classroom discussions, presentations, and hands on experiments students will discover how the brain works and controls the body.

Instructor: Nafisa Jadavji
School or Department: Neuroscience
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


211 - Biomedical Engineering: Crossroads of Medicine & Engineering

Technology is continually changing and growing. When it comes to new medical gadgets, biomedical engineers are on the forefront of development, helping to improve existing equipment and create new devices. Biomedical engineers apply their knowledge of science and math to medical problems to come up with exciting and innovative solutions. Learn what goes in to designing artificial organs and joints, predicting heart attacks before they happen, or using your eyeballs to control computers. These are the types of things that biomedical engineers help make possible. This mini course will focus on the types of tools that biomedical engineers use on a daily basis and allow for hands on experience measuring and manipulating biological signals. Students will get to tour the Biomed labs, experiment with the equipment and record their own Biosignals and vital signs.

Instructor: Mohamed Abdelazez
School or Department: System and Computer Engineering
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


212 - Making Your World: From Garbage to Goods!

In this hands-on course, you will experience what it is like to design a new product. The challenge: this new product must begin its life in the garbage dump. How can something new and exciting be made out of the stuff we throw away every day? Brainstorm ideas, develop new concepts through sketching and testing, and make models of your concept like a real industrial designer in a real design studio. The course will also introduce you to the values of sustainable design, the importance of market research and user needs, form and colour principles, two dimensional computer illustration, materials, and production processes. The week will conclude with a display, presentation, and discussion of student designs

Instructor: TBA
School or Department: Industrial Design
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


213 - Build Your Own Ideas

In this hands-on course, you will explore technological tools such as 3D printers and laser cutters and CAD tools to learn to make your own cool stuff! Classes will introduce you to the design process: brainstorm ideas, develop concepts through sketching, illustration, and CAD – all set in a design studio environment! The course will also introduce you to the importance of exploring ideas confidently, test ideas and get user feedback. The week will conclude with a display, presentation, and discussion of student designs.

Instructor: TBA
School or Department: Industrial Design
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


214 - Controlling your world is as easy as Pi. Raspberry Pi

Students will be introduced to the world of embedded computing with Raspberry Pi series of devices.

A Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that costs around $50, that can be easily setup to plug into your TV, and attach to your network, keyboard, and mouse. But it need not to be connected to anything. One of the first tasks given to the students would be to re-configure the device so it’s “standalone”. The Raspberry Pi is versatile because it can be connected to other devices to turn on/off lights, detect button presses, and even control motors (for those daring to try so).

The first few classes will be an introduction to the hardware, the Raspbrain operating system (i.e. Debian Linux), and how to connect to interface boards such as the PiFace, and the GERT board. We will also learn how to control the devices remotely. The students, working in pairs, will then be given the opportunity to use their own creativity to create their own system, that connects to “the internet of things”.

At the end of the week the students will take home their own Raspberry Pi starter kit, connectors & cables.

NOTE: There will be a $100 material fee for this class.


Instructor: Bobby Chawla
School or Department: System and Computer Engineering
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


215 - Introduction to International Human Rights Law

This course will examine the major International Human Rights Conventions which came to place post-WWII to prevent another world war. The Conventions establish the rights that every human being is entitled to, the obligations which States have to protect those rights and the mechanisms which have been put in place to monitor whether States are meeting those obligations. Students will develop a foundational understanding of the role which international organizations and States play in protecting human rights.

Instructor: Helyeh Doutaghi
School or Department: Law and Legal Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


216 - Life Adrift: Humanity in the context of Climate Change

This course will provide students with an overview of climate change and human mobility, in the context of the emerging environmental crises globally. With specific focus on the Global South and Indigenous communities, this course will present students with an opportunity to better understand the climate change-migration nexus, by critiquing the current views of this phenomenon. This course will dispel the simplistic notions of climate change migration. While the current view points towards direct impact of climate change to displacement, it is important to note the complexity in understanding this phenomenon. By exploring the complex interactions between various underlying vulnerabilities such as weak governance, conflict, food/economic insecurity etc., students will be able to better understand how climate change impacts such mobility or migration.

Instructor: Jay Ramasubramanyam
School or Department: Law and Legal Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


218 - Power and the City: How the municipal government impacts the lives of Canadians

Have you ever wondered how your favourite part of the city was planned and put together? This mini-course will explore the various functions of the modern city and the municipal level of government. How does the municipal government make decisions? How can residents participate in these decisions? Focusing on Ottawa, we will explore how decisions are made about everything from traffic flow, to park improvements, to legal graffiti walls. Students will get to learn from experienced guest speakers. Students will build upon this information by creating their own mini-city, engaging in role playing activities, and using SimCity. This course will also feature a short field trip to a location in Ottawa that demonstrates how developments in a city impact, and are impacted by, residents.

Instructor: Michael Petite
School or Department: Political Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


220 - Why Populism Is Rising in Europe

This mini-course will explore the emergence and rise of populist parties in the European Union. This course will examine the differing explanations for the causes of populism. Students will first learn how populism is defined in the literature, as well as the relationship of economic and cultural issues to the ideology of far-right populism. The course will then look at significant political, social, and economic shifts resulting from economic liberalization and modernization in Western European countries towards the end of the 20th century. Students will learn how these developments set in motion processes that facilitated the rise of domestic, far-right populist parties. Students will investigate the ways in which processes such as globalization, the end of the Cold War, and European integration have changed the political relationship both within and towards liberal democracy. The course will involve group assignments and class discussions, focusing on specifically on far-right populist parties in France (Front National, FN) and Germany (Alternative für Deutschland, AfD).

Instructor: Jennifer Diamond
School or Department: European, Eurasian, and Russian Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


221 - The Zine Scene! Self Publishing & the Power Of Youth Subcultures

Making media and creating culture, what’s youth got to do with it? This course will introduce some of the basic concepts of media and activism: theories of social change, subculture, small media and a few of the tactics and strategies facing D.I.Y youth movements from the 1980's until today. We will look at a number of zines to help understand the role of small media in supporting free speech, community building and empowerment in youth movements. A zine is a self-produced magazine, filled with text, photos, and drawings, stapled together and photocopied to distribute in small networks. On the final day, students will work together to write, draw, cut, photocopy and sew together a collaborative zine that can be taken home and shared!

Instructor: Meagan Bell
School or Department: Political Economy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


222 - How to be Right: An Introduction to Debate, Logic and Argumentation

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of debate, argumentation and logic. We will examine how arguments are constructed, what forms they may take and when they are invalid. Moreover, we will also study the different styles of debates, such as parliamentary debate. These more abstract formulations will be related throughout the course to important philosophies such as liberalism, socialism, and conservatism; so that students will be able to grasp not only how argument’s operate but also be able to recognize them in everyday discourse. The course will culminate with a class debate on a topic chosen by the students, in consultation with the teacher, where students will apply their critical thinking skills.

Instructor: Nicholas Favero
School or Department: Political Economy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


223 - Captivating Cultures: The European Union’s Culture and Identity

Want to know more about the food, music, landscapes, and heritage of European countries? What is identity and do Europeans share a common identity? What EU institutions are responsible for heritage? How does the EU’s cultural policy compare to Canada’s multicultural policy?

Throughout the week we will explore the EU’s cultural policy and examine the unique cultures of European countries through studying folklore, language, dance, policies and institutions. We will compare the EU’s approach to cultural policy and Canada’s own multicultural policy. This will be explored in detail through interactive activities, videos, presentations and guest speakers from selected embassies in Ottawa. Filled with colourful histories, distinct languages, unique folklore and delicious foods, this journey through Europe is sure to be a fun and engaging experience.

Instructor: Maria Colja
School or Department: Public Affairs
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


224 - From Me to We: Social Change using Public Relations

If you loved the 'Me to We' movement on 'We Day’ back in November -then this course is your next stop! What to do with all those good vibes -is to now make the social change in the world that you want to see! Take this mini course and learn hands on how to do it… In this Public Relations workshop course, you will learn fast how advertizing and public perception and ’spin' can make positive social changes happen in the world, raise money for needed cures and make corporations accountable. Using the same techniques as used in negative public relations - students in groups will choose a cause they care about and design a plan to help them using research, public relations and presenting. They will learn how to make a social impact immediately. Dive into how stakeholder research generates the same buying powers to help sell ideas along with products alike: Red Bull, Occupy-Wall Street, Cancer Research and iPhones. Students will learn public speaking and pitch presentations, skills to apply right away to be on Boards of charities, advise causes and raise much needed awareness and funds for a cause that matters to them in their lives outside of this week long course. Students have gone on to the Mayors Council, started their own charity, invited into the Prime Minister’s Youth Advisory Council and become Youth Directors on charitable boards.

Students enrolled in the Journalism School at Carleton University have the opportunity to look at what lies behind the scenes in a public relations campaign to change attitudes, win an election, sell consumer products and create positive change in the world. The world of public relations affects perceptions and once a student understands how and why it happens they can then choose to use it to do good?

This mini course helps the critical thinker become a do’er -to work behind the scenes and make social change and cause marketing works. Students at the end of this course become community leaders that lead the change they want to see.


Instructor: Karen Keskinen
School or Department: Journalism
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


225 - What's Wrong with the World? The Winners and Losers of Development

This course will introduce students to the issues of the developing world and the relationships that exist between the Global North and South. We will examine the established structures of power which are used to trap the developing world in poverty and conflict. The relationship between power and money and their influence on the the maintenance of the world order will be the cornerstone of this course.

Instructor: Jessica Gamarnik
School or Department: Political Economy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


226 - Guns and Lipgloss: Masculinity, Feminism and Popular Culture

Feminism isn’t a dirty word anymore! Even celebrities like Beyoncé, Emma Watson and our very own Prime Minister are taking back the label. Yet, though these discussions are largely positive, they often sideline men and boys. This course will bring together young people of all genders to look at how popular culture shapes the way we understand what is normal in society. Each day we will cover a specific form of popular culture, including: social media, movies, television, music and video games. Students will work in groups toward making a creative final project that will allow them to talk back to dominant gender norms in society. This project can take the form of a song, music video, short script, skit or video, blog or social media page, etc.

Disclaimer: This course will look at mature or sensitive subjects. This includes, but is not limited to, discussions of sex and sexuality, gender, race, violence, etc.


Instructor: Noah Schwartz
School or Department: Political Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


227 - GOT LAW? An Introduction to Canadian Law

Hey Canada Got Law? Ever wonder what your rights are at 14? At 18? Are they the same? Can you sue a hockey player for hitting you with a puck? Why can hockey players fight but throwing a punch at school could land you in a lot of trouble? What can your parents tell you to do....or not to do?

What does it mean to sign a contract? Can you even sign a contract at your age? In essence, we discuss the laws that regulate us every day. In this course participants will learn the basics of Municipal, Provincial and Federal law. Areas covered will be Ottawa By-Laws, Safe Schools Act, Criminal Law, Tort Law, Family Law, Civil Liberties, Landlord Tenant Law, Sports Law, International Law and more!!! Most of the course comes from questions the participants ask! This course designed for youth aged 12 to 17 as a focus is on the Youth Offenders Act. We will have field trips to the Supreme Court and Provincial court, Human Rights Monument. Participants will see real life court cases heard by judges. We will also use a variety of movies and YOUTUBE videos to illustrate concepts and ideas in law. Guest speakers are invited all week and will deliver interesting and interactive discussions on a variety of topics. We round off the week with career day and hear from Ottawa Police Services and law students! Got Law? is perfect for learning how the law is all around us, and how it shapes our society!


Instructor: Barbara Ann Vocisano
School or Department: Law and Legal Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


228 - Guess what survived in 5000-year-old China? (Non-engineering course)

China is one of the longest existing civilizations in the world. Time passed while culture progressed. In China, everyone is designated an animal when they are born; a beggar became a king in AD 1368; a woman’s smile destroyed a dynasty in BC 779; a medicine is famous for being worm in winter and grass in summer…do these catch your interest? From a large number of sources on Chinese culture, ten topics are included in this course which cover a wide variety of traditional Chinese customs and concepts that you will be most interested in. Hands-on practice such as Chinese calligraphy writing will also be provided! Bonus: every student will get an authentic Chinese name based on your own name, interests, and personality.

Instructor: Sijie Zhang
School or Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


229 - Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

With a view to the context of Canadian law, this course is designed to help youth learn strategies and techniques for effective negotiation and collaborative conflict resolution. Through this course, students will learn about how conflict resolution is integrated into legal processes through mediation, negotiation and arbitration. Students will be provided with practical tools that they can integrate into their skills. Conflict resolution skills and training can make a positive difference in students’’ lives as well as the lives others in their schools, families, and communities.

Instructor: Rebecca Bromwich
School or Department: Law and Legal Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


230 - Let's Get Activ(ist): Politics and Practice of Social Justice

Ever wondered how social change happens? This course will introduce some of the basic concepts of social justice activism: theories of social change, the history of social movements, tactics and strategies, and challenges to organizing that movements currently face. We will examine a wide array of social justice causes and their related movements and organizations: environmental justice, Indigenous rights, racial justice, queer and women’s liberation movements, the labour movement, and migrant justice. Emphasis will be placed on developing the tools and the knowledge required by future activists, politicians, community leaders, and citizens to meaningfully engage in the struggle for social justice within a rapidly changing political landscape. Additionally, students will be encouraged to use this as an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills around media and political presentation of social justice issues and topics.

Instructor: Chris Fairweather
School or Department: Political Economy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


231 - #Selfies, Vlogs, Tumblr & Blogs: Feminist Social Media for Social Change

We all know the stereotype: today’s youth are self-indulgent, consumer-driven, apathetic, social media zombies. But how much truth do these tropes really carry? And what about the socially conscious youth who are using feminist-inspired media as a platform for social change? Some say we are entering a wave of cyberfeminism, where youth are creating virtual spaces to grapple with feminist ideals of social justice, equality and human rights.
In this course we’ll engage in the reclamation of social media by using it to raise awareness and combat intersectional oppressions in our everyday lives. Using creative group activities and interactive multi-media projects, we’ll reboot problematic stereotypes about feminism, youth culture and technology. Let’s take back the feminist selfie, the zines and the tumblr pages to show how #youthculture can #changetheworld.

Trigger Warning: This course will touch on potentially sensitive issues like discrimination, oppression, violence against women, and cyber-bullying.


Instructor: Melissa Conte
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


232 - A History of the Age of Oil: Technology, Culture & Conflict, 1850-1950

This course offers a general introduction to the history of oil during the period 1850-1950, and will focus on the major social, cultural, political, and economic processes that shaped the first 100 years of the ‘Age of Oil.’ The course will investigate the historical development of oil in places across the world, including the Middle East, Britain, the United States, and Canada. Students will be introduced to the fundamental terms, events, and personalities of oil, and will be encouraged to think of their own connections to the resource. The ultimate aim of the course, therefore, is to strengthen students’ understanding of the history of oil, and the complex forces that have shaped the modern Age of Oil in which we live.

Instructor: Ian Wereley
School or Department: History
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


234 - Cosmic Stories: Creation and the Debate Between Science and Religion

How did all the wonders of the universe, stars, galaxies, black holes — us — come to be? Answers have existed for most of recorded history, but are now called myth. Today, two primary, and in many ways competing, answers to that grand question exist: one provided by science, the other by religion. What are the answers each provides? Why do they seem to be in conflict with each other? Can they exist together? We’ll explore science and religion using both history and sociology as our toolkit, exploring key figures in the history of science and religion, and some of the primary conflicts; using film, television, literature, and our own voices to explore this topic together.

The contents of this course will cover components from multiple faiths, including science. Therefore, it is advised that those who wish to participate must be open to questioning established religion and science in order to grasp more fully the themes they share, and those they do not.


Instructor: Anthony Nairn
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


235 - Somali Diasporas in Canada

This course will use storytelling as a method to provide an overview of Somali refugee arrival into Canada from the late 1980's. This will offer an interactive look at the 30 year linkages between government legislation and negative media representations of Somali-Canadians that impact diaspora members today.

Instructor: Hawa Mire
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


236 - From the pits to the streets: Mining and livelihoods in the Americas

Over the past 10 years there has been increased media attention to community resistance to mining around the globe. Due largely to technological advances and high mineral prices, Large-scale, open-pit mines have been popping up from Canada to Argentina, producing never-before seen quantities of minerals and metals. This course seeks to understand the social, political economic, cultural and geological facets of mining in the Americas. Over the week we will engage in discussions, map-making, documentary hunting, mock-mining exercises and take a fieldtrip to the Canadian Museum of Nature and a non-governmental organization's office in Ottawa.

Instructor: Kirsten Francescone
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


237 - The Buddha Goes Korean: Introduction to Buddhist Art of Ancient Korea in Transnational Perspective

Since Buddhism was introduced to Korea in the 4th century CE from China, it has been the main religion in Korea until now. Throughout the Korean history, Buddhist influence on art, culture, and daily lifestyle is paramount. In this mini-course, we are going to look at Buddhist art and architecture of ancient Korea approximately from the 4th century CE to the 10th century CE. Our goal is to acquaint ourselves with Buddhist iconography and to identify visual vocabulary of Korean Buddhist art. Buddhism as a religion and philosophy has travelled from its birthplace India to East Asia through the Silk Road. This is an exciting opportunity to uncover transnational traces of Buddhist aesthetics manifested in ancient Korean Buddhist art and visual culture.

Instructor: Euijung McGillis
School or Department: ICSLAC
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


238 - Information Management & Data Analytics: Learning from the Past and Predicting the Future!

In this modern era of internet, smart phones and social media, everything is becoming electronic in-nature. Individuals and organizations are attempting to make communication and data to be digital. A lot can be done with this data if it is utilized efficiently and effectively. We can analyze data from the past to identify interesting patterns, using descriptive analytics. We can also utilize data from past to predict future trends, using predictive analytics.

During this course, students will learn, using well-known software tools, how to collect raw digital data, manage and visualize data on day to day basis, how to analyze data to perform descriptive and predictive analytical techniques to discover and identify interesting patterns in the past and predict future trends!


Instructor: Mackenzie Ostler
School or Department: Cognitive Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


239 - Write by the River – Explore, reading, writing, travel, & life.

Part writing workshop, part creative inquiry into the possibilities of living, this course will take place in a window lined room beside water, and occasionally, on the banks of the lovely Rideau river. Together we will learn skills to help you read and write poetry, short stories, novels, personal essays, articles, blogs, musical lyrics, travel, humour and memoir writing. Students will view a thought provoking film, and write fun, stimulating writing exercises designed to unlock their great ideas and jumpstart their creative thinking. You will write a postcard story, and in groups of three write 3 chapter mini novels. Shared in class writing will be discussed and any previously written pieces you wish to bring along will also receive feedback and encouragement. You can look forward to a guest writer, homemade chocolate chip cookies, and other pleasant surprises.

Instructor: Richard Taylor
School or Department: English
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


240 - Parlez-vous français? : French for day-to-day communication

Have you had some exposure to French, but struggle to use it in day-to-day communication? In 2011, 10 million Canadians reported being able to conduct a conversation in French. Why not join yourself to that number? In this class, we will emphasize oral expression and comprehension: we will train the ear to “hear” and reproduce patterns and sounds while respecting the rhythm and intonation of the French language spoken at a natural speed. Students will be exposed to vocabulary and basic grammar in context, and will learn to use them orally, improving both their listening and speaking skills. Please note that this course will largely be taught in French.

Instructor: Francine Benny
School or Department: French
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


241 - Picturing Madness: Mental Illness on Screen

From Repulsion (1965) to Girl, Interrupted (1999), the stories of the so-called mad are constantly being portrayed on film. This often leads to inaccurate representations of mental illness. Together, we will examine issues of stigmatization and marginalization, as a social problem, exaggerated by misleading and negative images. In exploring films and madness, we will also look at some of the major themes in psychiatric history, as a means to develop a better sense of the present debates. Films will then become a gateway to learn about the reality of mental illness rather than just readily accepting it as reality. So, whether you love movies, history, or are passionate about mental health, you will love this class!

Instructor: Kira Smith
School or Department: History
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


242 - Youth Understanding and Changing the World: Your Chance to Stand Out!

We will look at how youth has positively changed society and the challenges that lie ahead. Usually, youth are not taken into consideration because people think that they are “too young” to do this or that, but young people like you have brought up valuable change. We will address four important topics, one per day: what being young today means, youth and migration in Canada, youth and indigenous issues, and poverty in Ottawa. The last day will be Action Day, where you will put into action what we learned during the course off-campus. The course is full of activities and hand-on experiences. We make wide use of YouTube, films, a mini-survey, and group projects, but overall, we will have a good time!

Instructor: Alejandro Hernandez
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


243 - Psychology and Criminal Justice: Helping Catch Criminals!

This course will introduce students to the exciting world of forensic psychology. Throughout this weeklong course, students will explore the ways in which psychology and the law interact. Students will be introduced to a range of topics including: eyewitness memory, jury decision making, criminal profiling, deception detection, psychopathy, and police investigations. The course will introduce content through the use of lectures, discussions, activities, and videos. Please note that this course may discuss mature/ sensitive topics (i.e., criminal acts, violence, homicide).

Instructor: Chelsea Sheahan
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


244 - Remix, Reuse, Recycle

Ideas of the originality and the uniqueness of the object have dominated thinking about creativity, but much of our culture builds on the past in order to make it new and fresh. From the fine arts to popular culture and fashion we find elements of “borrowing,” “quoting,” and outright “stealing” when it comes to our cultural forms. In this course we ask questions about what it means to make cultural objects, how laws like copyright and patent restrict creativity, and willfully plunder and pirate culture to make our own poetry, songs, and images. Tracing the cultural emergence of remixing will involve listening to music, watching films, reading poetry, talking about fashion, exercising our rights to fair use, plagiarizing, and borrowing from our shared cultural archives.

Instructor: David Jackson
School or Department: Communications and Media Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


245 - Solving Ten Great Mysteries from the History of Art

Art historians are like good detectives. They search for clues until they figure out all there us about a work of art–who made it, when, and why. Who commissioned it? And how did it end up on a museum wall? Throughout the week, we will don our detective hats and investigate some of the most enigmatic works of art. Using a combination of content-driven and inquiry-based learning strategies, we will search for clues both in the images themselves and in the historical record in order to solve the mysteries surrounding them. In addition to learning about ambitious painters, capricious princesses, and their curious pets, we will also develop critical thinking skills through close looking and participatory visual analysis exercises. Following a guided visit to the National Gallery of Canada, students will work individually or in small groups to produce short stories in the mystery genre related to a work at the museum and based on the lines of inquiry employed in the cases.

Instructor: TBA
School or Department: ICSLAC
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


246 - Science Friction: Exploring Scientific Controversies Across Cultural Locations

This mini-course will introduce students to the study of how science intervenes in society and influences social organization. Beginning with an exploration of the question "what is a scientific fact?", students will learn about the emergence of experimental method and the history of science when it comes to making cultural decisions about what is natural, pure, just, and good. The role of science in producing technologies and knowledge in contemporary democratic societies, including new hopes and fears, and challenges with politicization and scientific certainty, will be examined through case studies touching on a range of topics including war, eugenics, genetics, patents, food, migrant populations, race, sexuality, and the natural environment.

*Please be advised that throughout this course we will address a broad range of issues, and particularly while discussing case studies involving inequality and marginalization of social groups, we will touch on topics that may be sensitive to students such as suicide, colonization and intergenerational trauma, racism, homophobia, and various forms of violence, discrimination, and oppression.


Instructor: Christian Pasiak
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


247 - Introduction to the Philosophy of Metaphor

In this course, we will survey and critically analyze the philosophical discourse on metaphor as it has been traditionally defined by three main theories: the pseudo-semantic theory of Max Black, the non-cognitive theory of Donald Davidson, and the pragmatic theory of John Searle. With this critical analysis, we will see how these three philosophers have contributed to our understanding of what metaphors are, what metaphors mean, where the “power” of metaphors lie, and how we can restrict our possible interpretations of a metaphor. From here, we will see how the leading theory in the philosophy of metaphor, Relevance Theory, has attempted to accommodate for the virtues and vices of these three theories and some of the resistance that this theory has been met with.

Instructor: Alyssa Tremblay
School or Department: Philosophy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


249 - Language in the Brain through the Eyes of a Nerd

You know where your heart is, you know where your lungs are, but do you know where language is? Have you ever wondered how children jump from knowing two to three words, to suddenly having vast vocabulary? Do you find animal communication fascinating? What can you do with a career in Linguistics? In this course, we will virtually dissect the brains of humans and animals to answer these questions and many more! This interactive course will provide a brief introduction to various techniques such a field work and brain-imaging and you will discover language beyond grammar rules and Shakespeare. You will get hands-on experience by collecting, analyzing and interpreting real-life linguistic material. The course introduces you to Linguistic and Psycholinguistic research.

Instructor: Roxana-Maria Barbu
School or Department: Cognitive Science
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


250 - Social Justice in Action!

Young people have the power to effect positive social change in their communities, Canada, and beyond! In this course, students will develop the skills to become social justice advocates and empower others to do the same. Throughout the week, guest speakers, collaborative activities, and exercises will expose students to a range of perspectives and approaches being used to work towards greater social justice, with a particular focus on social justice advocacy and activism happening in Ottawa. To put what they have learned into action, students will develop an advocacy project including but not limited to: blogs, social media campaign, or a how-to video, about actions young people can take to effect social change today.

Instructor: Cora MacDonald
School or Department: Sociology and Anthropology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


251 - The Climate Change Challenge: Let’s Beat It!

Come join us in our challenge to discover 100 jobs that help fight climate change! In this course, we will learn about things that we never knew were related to climate change and about jobs that we never thought could help fight it. This course is hand-on and interactive and it is for young people who want to make a difference in this world, but need a little help with knowing how to.

Instructor: Esther Briner
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


252 - More Than Just a Song: Popular Music, Gender and Society

In this introduction to musicology, students will learn about music from a variety of perspectives, including its history and place in our lives. How does music shape, define and reflect culture? What are the connections between music and constructions of gender and sexuality? We will discuss these and other lesser-known aspects of popular music.

Expect a highly interactive course where students will discover different ways of listening to, and talking about, music. We will explore a variety of genres and styles including rock and roll, hip-hop, blues, and more. Course highlights include music video and lyrical analyses, listening examples, and hands-on musical experiences, including drum circles. You don’t need to play an instrument; if you love music, this course is for you!

Note: We will discuss representations of gender and sexuality, and some of the musical examples have a swear words. Most of the students will have seen and heard this kind of thing before through music videos, TV and film.


Instructor: Keith McCuaig
School or Department: ICSLAC
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


253 - From Dreaming to Drugs: Exploring the Mysteries of the Mind

Have you ever been curious about why people think, feel, and act the way they do? If you’ve ever had questions about emotions, dreaming, criminal activity, the senses, mental illness, child development, the brain, or drugs, then psychology is for you! During this course, you will learn about each of the different areas of psychology as we travel through the mind. You will become a psychology researcher and create your own in-class experiment while learning about the scientific method. We will debunk common psychology myths and observe psychology in action. Fun activities and real life examples will let you personally experience the marvels of the mind. After this course, you will never look at yourself the same way again!

Instructor: Mariya Davydenko
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


254 - Music at the Movies

John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Michael Giacchino—the names of film composers are as familiar as those of the directors they work for, yet few people know how they create movie magic. This mini-course explores the world of composing for film by examining soundtracks and composers for some of the biggest movies of the last decade: the Star Wars franchise, the Dark Knight trilogy, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Harry Potter… We’ll answer questions like: How do they compose? How and when is music added to the movie? Why does the film’s soundtrack have such an impact on audiences? If you can’t read music, that’s no problem: our course bases itself on hearing (and seeing) movies, not following scores.

Instructor: Jamex Deaville
School or Department: Music
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


255 - Me, Myself, and Science!

Have you ever wondered: How the brain works? What is “the mind”? Why do we dream? And what does any of this have to do with Artificial Intelligence?! If you have, this course is for you!

From fundamental building blocks of science to cutting edge research, we will traverse different fields of psychological research to explore how humanity has sought to learn more about who we are. Through group discussions we will explore what psychology is, how psychologists study people, popular theories of the mind, and state of the art technology in research. For the second half of this course, students will choose their own lecture topics.


Instructor: Misha Sokolov
School or Department: Psychology
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


256 - Introduction to Japanese

Have you ever wanted to visit Japan? Taste the freshest sushi, see where all your favourite video games and anime are made, or journey up Mount Fuji. Make sure you can ask someone how to get to Tokyo Station by taking your first step to learning Japanese in this introductory course. In this course, you will learn how to introduce yourself, greet others, ask questions, and writing in Japanese. We will also explore Japanese culture along the way. What are other cities outside of Tokyo famous for? What is high school life like in Japan? Take this course to learn basic Japanese communication skills and get a glimpse into Japanese culture and customs with various class activities.

Instructor: Kaori Sugimura
School or Department: Linguistics and Language Studies
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


257 - Lights, Camera, Justice! Exploring Philosophy Through Film

What is justice? Should we value democracy? How would you live if you had to relive today for the rest of your life? In this mini-course, we will explore these and other big questions through some of the masterpieces of Western cinema such as 'Groundhog Day' and 'Twelve Angry Men'. Short lectures will introduce philosophical themes and authors to guide students through the films. Join us for a week of great movies, though-provoking discussion, and plenty of popcorn!

Please note: the films in this course explore a wide range of issues. While none of them contain explicitly graphic or adult content, they might be seen as controversial from some perspectives. Humanities students should be able to develop a critical distance and approach when dealing with material of any medium. If this poses a problem, you must contact the instructors before taking the course


Instructor: Joseph Baker and John Ryan
School or Department: Philosophy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


258 - Philosophy as Happiness: Spinoza's Path to a Self-Empowered Life of Love

Although philosophy is usually seen as a theoretical discipline, it can also be understood as a way of life. In this course, we will explore Baruch Spinoza's view of philosophy as a pathway to happiness in particular. We will discuss how Spinoza understands science, pleasure, love, friendship, and freedom to contribute to living a good life. As a group, we will explore what happiness means to each of us, how Spinoza might change our views on happiness, and what, if anything, he has to offer in really helping each of us live well day-to-day. The purpose of this course is (1) to think about ourselves and life in new ways and (2) to learn about the practical benefits and importance of studying philosophy.

Instructor: Brandon Smith
School or Department: Philosophy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11


259 - Ethics: Descrimination Need Not Apply

“I see a world
A world turning in on itself
Are we just like
Hungry wolves howling in the night?”

Ethics. We run into the word all the time, but what does it mean? In this course, we will look at a number of ethical theories from the West, East, and Indigenous beliefs in order to try to understand what we mean when we use the word “ethics”. Once we have an understanding of ethics, we will then apply it to different cases of discrimination like sexism, racism, and disability. What does each ethical theory say about what is right and what is wrong in each case? Which ethical theory seems to give us the answer we think is most right?



Instructor: Courtney Crump
School or Department: Philosophy
Grades: Min: 8 - Max: 11